Developing Countries Will Lead Global Rice Import Growth in 2013-22, Says USDA Rice growers positive California MG prices are UP Russia MG Harvest coming to end Egypt open rice exports Vietnam’s rice export in tough competition with India Thai rice exports in May Rise Above Target This Year Viet-Nam Rice exports likely to fall this year
Australia Medium Grain Rice #1 $ N/A    Egypt 101 #2 $760    Egypt 178 #2 Rice $730    EU Prices Baldo €660    EU Prices LG-A Ariete 5% €550    EU Prices MG Lotto 5% €500    EU Prices RG Balilla 5% €500    Russia Rapan $ 700    USA Jupiter Paddy $375    USA Calrose #1 Paddy $480    USA Jupiter Rice $630    USA Calrose #1 $830   

 Main Page
 Home Page of This Title
 Medium Grain Rice Market
 Global Market News
 Grain News
 Pulses News
 Global Overview
 Importers Profile
 Exporters Profile
 What Is Rice
 History Of Rice
 Rice Harvest Seasons
 Rice Processing
 Rice Nutrition Facts
 Meals With Rice
 Restaurants
 INCO Terms
 Ports
 US Rice Standards
 EU Codex Standards
 Egyptian Specs
 Sponsor List
 All Links
 Rice
 Grain
 Agriculture
 Commodity Exchange
 Weather
 Other
 Info
 Editor
 Advertisement
 Technical
Search in news database
Free trade in rice can lead to more hunger - study
Reuters
GENEVA (Reuters) - Free trade in rice has increased hunger and poverty among subsistence farmers in at least three developing countries, an anti-poverty advocacy group said on Thursday.

The Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance examined the local impacts of decisions to open national rice markets to foreign imports in Ghana, Honduras and Indonesia.

Its study supported what many advocacy groups have long suspected -- that free trade policies exacerbated hunger and poverty, rather than helping countries out of it.

"The causes we found were mainly due to liberalisation of markets and reductions of tariffs," Jean Blaylock, global trade campaign officer for the alliance, told Reuters.

The findings of the study run counter to the thinking behind the Doha round of trade talks at the World Trade Organisation (WTO), which aims to help poorer nations export their way out of poverty by freeing up global trade.

The study also reinforces the conclusion that aid to developing countries in the form of food can devastate the livelihoods of local farmers.

Rice is the staple food for half the world's population.

NO BENEFIT FOR CONSUMERS

Blaylock said the study showed that rice farmers, while not starving, were cutting back on their children's education, health care and at times food, and the beneficiaries of cheap rice imports were the importing companies rather than consumers.

"In all three countries, the influx of cheap imports has not even necessarily equated to lower costs for consumers because of the high concentration of the rice business," the group said.

"Thus both producers and consumers in the national economy can lose in the drive to liberalise markets to international trade," it said in a statement.

Rice growing and processing are the main source of income for around 2 billion people, it said. International trade in rice accounts for only 6.5 percent of global consumption.

The study showed that Ghanaian rice farmers in Dalun, Northern Region, had seen demand for their product drop 75 percent since 2000 as rice from the United States, Vietnam and Thailand flooded the local market.

Rice production in Honduras collapsed in the early 1990s when the government removed tariffs and producer support under International Monetary Fund and World Bank programmes, it said.

Huge amounts of rice dumped on the Honduran market as food aid from the United States after two natural disasters, Hurricane Mitch and Tropical Storm Michelle, eliminated demand for local rice at a fair price.

"Donations ... of milled rice came from abroad, and the municipalities were full of milled rice. They started giving this rice to everybody. So the market was saturated and rice producers didn't know what to do with their rice," the study quoted Honduran farmer Eduardo Benitez as saying.

Rice imports to Indonesia increased under liberalisation expanded after the 1997 Asia financial crisis, creating volatility in producer and consumer prices resulting in higher poverty, malnutrition and debt, it said.
MGR Archive 4.11.2007
Printer Friendly Version Of This Article
Send This Article To A Friend
User Name:
Password:
      Forgot your Password?
Region Type Price  
Russia Rapan $ 700
USA Jupiter Rice $630
USA Calrose #1 $830
USA Calrose #1 Paddy $480
EU Prices Baldo €660
Click for Details

Medium Grain Reports
Rice Market News
World Rice Markets and Trade
USDA Country Reports
Rice Market Monitor
Rice Outlook
Italian Paddy Supply
European Rice Weekly
EU Reports
Convert this amount:


Convert
  © 2002 All rights reserved. - Legal Notice